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History of Honeoye Lake

Honeoye Lake, one of New York state's famous Finger Lakes, is located in beautiful Ontario County. Clean and pristine, this minor Finger Lake is the county's blue jewel, providing residents and visitors with more than 1,700 acres of outdoor activity and water fun.

The lake, whose name is an Iroquois word meaning "where the finger lies," is the tenth smallest of the eleven Finger Lakes. Though often thought to be formed by shifting ice masses during the Ice Age, the Finger Lakes were actually preglacial stream valleys or small lakes before the Ice Age, molded and carved into their current form by the shifting glaciers. Many years after their formation, the Iroquois Native Americans arrived to the Finger Lakes area, cultivating the land, fishing the waters, and hunting animals for food.

Today, the Finger Lakes are one of New York's top vacation destinations, pulling in more than $200 million in tourism dollars each year. Honeoye Lake, though comparatively small, welcomes more than its fair share of visitors. Indeed, anglers flock to the lake each year, dreaming of Honeoye's teems of black crappie, bluegill, largemouth bass, pickerel, pumpkinseed, rockbass, smallmouth bass, walleye, and yellow perch. As many will tell you, there's no bad spot or time to fish on Honeoye: the lake's fish bite anytime, anywhere. Among those dedicated enough to brave the winter cold, ice fishing is a Honeoye specialty.

The lake's primary use is water-based recreation, and fishing is only the beginning. During summer months, the reservoir is alive with activity, and Honeoye Lake's surface is always dotted with canoes, kayaks, speed boats, and the occasional sail boat. If you plan to boat, both the Honeoye Lake Public Boat Launch and Sandy Bottom Beach recreation area offer public boat launches. Both are maintained during winter, as well, providing lake access to ice fishers.

Begin your Honeoye Lake vacation at Sandy Bottom Beach, where you can launch your boat, lunch in the picnic pavilion, play baseball at the recreation area's baseball diamond, and amuse the kids at the playground. Dip your toes into Honeoye's inviting waters, which, with a maximum depth of just 30 feet, are the warmest of all Finger Lake waters. If swimming doesn't appeal, simply relax and enjoy the sun along the lifeguarded, sandy beach.

If lounging lakeside is a good way to spend the day, then boating along Honeoye Lake can only be called the lake's most beautiful experience. Taking a boat out onto Honeoye is the best way to discover hidden treasures along the lake's almost 11-mile shoreline, which welcomes bathing birds, shy wildlife, and an incredible wealth of second-growth forest. So when it's finally time to hit the water, launch your boat, head out into the great aquatic wilderness, and ready yourself for scenery that will both amazing and relax you.

As summer fades to fall, and later winter, you'll find that Honeoye is one of those unique lakes that merely shifts focus, offering year round recreational opportunities. Thanks to its northern location and altitude, Honeoye is home to a spectacular autumn leaf spectacle. Each year, the lake's shores blaze with red, orange, and yellow leaves, whose beauty is only rivaled by their own reflections along the lake's crystalline waters. In winter, colorful leaves fade into pure white snow, the perfect canvass for snowmobiling, cross country skiing, and, of course, a good, old-fashioned snowball fight.

No matter what the season, there is one area attraction worth a day trip from Honeoye Lake. Letchworth State Park, located just 35 miles from your freshwater paradise, is one of New York's most incredible displays of gushing water, carved-out rock, and emerald-green scenery, offering miles of walking trails for visitors' enjoyment. Three major waterfalls, one the largest in the state, are enough to take your breath away, and their protective Portage Canyon, nicknamed the "Grand Canyon of the East," will do the same. Postcard-perfect scenery awaits, so a trip here is truly a must.

Only Honeoye Lake's acreage is small, as the New York reservoir is big on year round fun, fishing, and water sports. Vacationing here is the ideal mix of relaxation and active fun, offering a quiet Finger Lake escape, convenient to all activities. After just one vacation, you'll know why so many call Honeoye their favorite Finger Lake.


HIKING:
Harriet Hollister Spencer State Park:  Although it offers no direct access with Honeoye Lake, this state park has a breathtaking view of the southern end of the lake from high atop Canadice Hill, 2,200 feet in elevation. Numerous trails cater well to hiking and biking and the scenic vistas are popular picnic locations. The far-above-average snowfall makes this park a favorite among winter sport enthusiasts.
Honeoye Inlet Wildlife Management Area: This newly purchased state land encompasses 2,100 acres along the Honeoye Inlet at the south end of the lake. Comprised of meadows, forested upland and marshland, this area is largely undeveloped.
Wesley Hill Nature Preserve: What this 390 acre preserves lacks in size it makes up for in character. The Finger Lakes Land Trust preserves this collection of upland woodlands, mature forests and steep gullies, including portions of the massive Briggs Gully.
Grimes Glen County ParkThis well-preserved Finger Lakes glen is the perfect compliment to the Naples country-side. Thanks to the efforts of the Finger Lakes Land Trust and Ontario county, people can enjoy this wonderful park and its cool, refreshing water. The previous landowners allowed hikers to explore the glen, but its future was in question. Thanks to the efforts of all the parties involved, in 2008 Grimes Glen became an Ontario County park and it preservation assured. The park consists of 32 acres, including several waterfalls and a heavily wooded hillside along the creek. Grimes Glen is far longer than the park itself, but the remainder is on private property.

Cumming Nature CenterThe RMSC Cumming Nature Center is a 900-acre preserve located 40 minutes south of Rochester, New York in the Finger Lakes region near the village of Naples.  The center features groomed trails for hiking in spring, summer, and fall, and for snowshoeing and classic cross-country skiing in the winter months.  In spring, summer and fall, walk six miles of gentle hiking trails through woods and wetlands.  Bring a snack or lunch to enjoy in the Visitors Center where restrooms are available.  Seasonal weekend programs include maple sugaring in spring and a timber sports competition among college woodsman teams in October.   In the winter months, 15 miles of groomed trails welcome cross-country skiers. Snowshoers enjoy a 2-mile loop trail of their own.  Children will enjoy Leap Frog Pond -- a permanent play space designed especially for preschoolers. Over-sized frogs, turtles, tadpoles, lily pads and mushrooms fill a make-believe pond.

SKIING:
Hunt Hollow Ski Club: Enjoy skiing and riding on nearly 100 acres of terrain covering the second highest mountain in Western New York; scenic trails for cross-country skiing, snowshoeing and hiking; and a spacious Alpine lodge providing scenic views, fireplaces, grills and gourmet catering.
Bristol Mountain Ski Resort: at 1,200 feet, this is the highest skiing mountain between the Adirondacks and the Rockies. It boasts 2 terrain parks, half-pipe, 33 slopes and trails, night skiing, rental facilities, a Ski School, skier baby-sitting, a cafeteria, a lounge, and year round banquet facilities.

WATER SPORTS:
Trident Marine: Located on Honeoye Lake and includes a shop of everything needed to have a fun day in the sun out on the lake.  Gas pumps and boat rentals available

GOLFING:
Bristol Harbor Golf Course - Cannadaigua, NY

Resevoir Creek Golf Course - Naples, NY

Old Hickory Golf Course - Livonia, NY
Lima Country Club 4740 Chase Road, Lima, NY 14485 (585) 624-1490

 

GEOCACHING  Geocaching is a high-tech treasure hunting game played throughout the world by adventure seekers equipped with GPS devices. The basic idea is to locate hidden containers, called geocaches, outdoors and then share your experiences online. Geocaching is enjoyed by people from all age groups, with a strong sense of community and support for the environment.